Learning for All

References: Instructional Planning

Quick Guide #11 “Co-Designing Responsive Curriculum” by Alice Udvari-Solnar (pp. 151-164) in Quick Guides for Inclusion: Ideas for Educating Students with Disabilities, 2nd edition

Chapter 1: “More Content, More Learning, More Inclusion” (pp. 3-14) by Diane M. Browder and Fred Spooner in More Language Arts, Math and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities

Shurr, Jordon and Bouck, Emily C., “Research on Curriculum for Students with Moderate and Severe Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review” in Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 2013, 48 (1), 76-87


Balancing Functional and Academic Programming: Increasing Outcomes for Students with Significant Disabilities

I Can Identify Saturn but I Can’t Brush My Teeth: What Happens When the Curricular Focus for Students with Severe Disabilities Shifts (Ayres, Douglas, Lowrey & Sievers)
http://www.daddcec.org/Portals/0/CEC/Autism_Disabilities/Research/Publications/Education_Training_Development_Disabilities/2011v46_Journals/ETADD_201103v46n1p11-21_I_Can_Identify_Saturn_but_I_Can’t_Brush_My_Teeth.pdf

Seven Reasons to Promote Standards-Based Instruction for Students with Severe Disabilities: A Reply to Ayres, Lowrey, Douglas, & Sievers, 2011 (Courtade, Jimez, Spooner & Browder, 2012)
http://factoregon.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Courtade-Browder-Article1.pdf

The Question Still Remains: What Happens When the Curricular Focus for Students with Severe Disabilities Shifts? A Reply to Courtade, Spooner, Browder & Jimeniz, 2012 (Ayres, Douglas, Lowrey & Sievers, 2012)
http://daddcec.org/Portals/0/CEC/Autism_Disabilities/Research/Publications/Education_Training_Development_Disabilities/2011v47_journals/ETADD_2012v47n1p14-22_The_question_still_remains.pdf

Finding the Balance: A Response to Hunt and McDonnell (Browder, 2012)
http://rps.sagepub.com/content/37/3/157.extract

Reconciling Ecological Educational Planning with Access to the Common Core: Putting the Cart Before the Horse?: A Response to Hunt and McDonnell (Ayres, 2012)
http://www.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/tteam/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Ayres-2012.pdf

Secondary students with moderate/severe intellectual disability: considers of curriculum and post-school outcomes from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (Bouck, 2012) – requires requesting free membership in ResearchGate
http://www.researchgate.net/publication/221736933_Secondary_students_with_moderatesevere_intellectual_disability_considerations_of_curriculum_and_post-school_outcomes_from_the_National_Longitudinal_Transition_Study-2

Research on Curriculum for Students with Moderate and Severe Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review (Shurr & Bouck, 2013)
http://daddcec.org/Portals/0/CEC/Autism_Disabilities/Research/Publications/Education_Training_Development_Disabilities/ETADD_48(1)_76-87.pdf


Literacy
Browder, D.M. & Spooner, F. Chapter 5: Reading for Students who are Nonverbal in More Language Arts, Math, and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., 2014

Browder, D.M. & Spooner, F. Chapter 6: Comprehensive Beginning Reading in More Language Arts, Math, and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., 2014

Browder, D.M. & Spooner, F. Chapter 7: Teaching Written Expression to Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities in More Language Arts, Math, and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., 2014

Browder, D.M. & Spooner, F. Chapter 13: Promoting Learning in General Education for All Students in More Language Arts, Math, and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., 2014

Quick Guide #13 “Supporting Literacy Learning in All Children” by David A. Koppenhaver and Karen A. Erickson (pp. 181-194) in Quick Guides for Inclusion: Ideas for Educating Students with Disabilities, 2nd edition

Quick Guide #14 “Writing Matters” by Patricia McGonegal and Nancy Talbott (pp. 195-208) in Quick Guides for Inclusion: Ideas for Educating Students with Disabilities, 2nd edition


Numeracy
Browder, D.M. & Spooner, F. Chapter 8: Beginning Numeracy Skills in More Language Arts, Math, and Science for Students with Severe Disabilities. Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co., 2014

Quick Guide #15 “Making Math Meaningful for Students with Special Needs” by Timothy J. Whiteford (pp. 209-222) in Quick Guides for Inclusion: Ideas for Educating Students with Disabilities, 2nd edition


Additional recommendations by members of the community of practice

INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING

The Need for a more Dynamic and Ecological Assessment of Children Experiencing Barriers to Learning to move towards Inclusive Education: a Summary of Results of the Daffodil Project
ABSTRACT – Although governments have recognized the need to make education more accessible to children with developmental disabilities and/or learning difficulties, many children remain excluded from participation in regular school settings, let alone receive adequate education. Though every country which ratified the United Nations (UN) 2006 Convention on the Rights of People with Disability has committed itself to inclusive education, there are many obstacles. One of them is the currently preferred way of assessing children with standardized, psychometric diagnostic tests with a classifying purpose. This type of assessment, based on a medical impairment model and a static model of intelligence, results in reports which are sometimes not very useful for educational advice. http://tinyurl.com/zfa8klp
Posted by Monica Braat (Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education)

SWIFT
I was directed to SWIFT earlier this evening and thought I needed to share what I found with the group.
I encourage you to take a peek at what they are doing across schools in the states. There is quite a bit of research here too.
http://www.swiftschools.org

LITERACY

Building Wings: How I Made It Through School
We are going to be doing a one-block literacy/advocacy class for students with significant disabilities in our high school this fall. In the beginning it will mostly be about setting up a high school 4-Blocks class based on David Koppenhaver and Karen Erickson’s book but we are also looking to embed elements of Self-Determination in to the class over time.

One of our first activities is going to be a book study of the book Building Wings: How I Made It Through School by Don Johnston. The book is his personal story of coming to understand himself as a learner. You can access the electronic copy of the book (that will read the book and highlight words) for free. There are also resources to do a Reader’s Theatre and/or create a visual version of the book. I think it is going to be a great step in to getting students to think about themselves about what they need to be successful learners.

Here is a link to a page to find out more if you’re interested: http://donjohnston.com/building-wings/#.VbpYk_lViko. You can get to the free version and things like reader’s theatre by following the links on the right hand side of this front page :).

First Author Writing Measures: Developmental Writing Scale
Great tool to use when thinking about what to focus on next in supporting a student in writing.
Posted by Monica Braat (Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education)

fa_writing_measures_-_bender.pdf
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Literacy and Communication Instruction in the Inclusive Classroom Angelman Webinar Series with Erin Sheldon
Passing on a couple of great webinars featuring Erin Sheldon – an assistive technology specialist and mom to a child with Angelman’s. She has done extensive work around setting up an amazing inclusive program for her daughter and others. The first video is on inclusive education more generally. The second includes strategies and approaches to focus on literacy. The third video focuses on supporting communication in the inclusive classroom. They all fit nicely together.
Video 1 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpnGXLKich8
Video 2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfUKgFa3ubo
Video 3 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWMlL4PIJx4
Posted by Monica Braat (Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education)

Dynamic Learning Maps: English Language Arts Essential Elements Scope and Sequence
I mentioned the document that I’m posting her in the response to the post right below this. Posting it in case it might be helpful to anyone else. What I have done is taken the Dynamic Learning Maps Essential Elements for English Language Arts (http://dynamiclearningmaps.org/sites/default/files/documents/ELA_EEs/DLM%20Essential%20Elements%20ELA%20%282013%29%20v4.pdf) and rewritten them in a way that helps me to target literacy skills for the students that I work with.

For example, if the class the student is in is working on narrative writing, I am able to go to the section on narrative writing and get a feel for where that specific student is on the developmental continuum from grade 1-12 and then we can target a skill to focus on. It also helps in some of the pull out intervention we do on specific skills to have a scope and sequence we can follow. We do not by any means try to cover every single one of these skills but what I’m looking to do is keep track of the skills that a student is able to demonstrate so that as we come back to these skills from year to year with different teachers we have an idea of where to start.

Again… I want to emphasize that there is nothing in this document that I have created. It is from the Essential Learning Outcome document that already exists. It just worked better for what I’m trying to do to have it arranged this way.
Posted by Monica Braat (Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education)

dlm_essential_outcomes_scope_and_sequence_-_english_language_arts.docx
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Dynamic Learning Maps
I had the opportunity to attend the Assistive Technology Industry Association conference last week. Karen Erickson shared information on the additions to the Dynamic Learning Maps project. Definitely worth checking out frequently as they are frequently adding resources http://dynamiclearningmaps.org

Boardmaker Share
I have used this site to search in curricular areas for activities and visuals in specific areas. You can download to use and change it to suit your student. Great for templates and helps to cut down on prep time for activities.
https://br.boardmakershare.com/register

Tar Heel Reader
I have used this resource to find books on a particular subject area for students and to create books with students. Easy to use and accessible from iPad or computer. The resource has speech that you can either have on or off depending on purpose.
http://tarheelreader.org
Posted by Shirley Craig (Pembina Hills Regional Division)

Options for Summarizing Text
Just wanted to pass on the links to several summarizing tools that can be used to reduce curriculum content down to something that is more manageable to work with.  We are starting to play around with taking curriculum content, putting it in to a summarizing tool and then creating information books using the Pictello app using the reduced content.  We are still finding that we can’t take it exactly as is (have to take a look at the vocabulary and complexity of the content) but it is giving us some ideas for a starting point in some situations.  Wanted to pass these on as before I started digging I had only seen Text Compactor and didn’t realize there were other summarizing tools out there.

Posted by Monica Braat (Medicine Hat Catholic Board of Education)

Journaling Tips
After I went to the session with Caroline Musselwhite on Friday October 31st, I tried out the updated version of Book Creator and loved it.  I especially loved the way that a student could use the whole screen to write with a stylist and then we could simple shrink that box to make it fit on the page.  You can add sound, images, text, and move all of these elements freely on the page!

I had the images ready (another suggestion by Caroline)  in another fun app called Doodle Paper.  I searched images on the Internet and  opened the images up in Doodle Paper as a sketch image.  Total prep time:  maybe 5 minutes

Prior to writing the story, I installed the app Keeble.  This is an app that you turn on in the general settings of your iPad as an alternative keyboard.  It is easy to use and once installed opens in ALL apps.  What I like most about this keyboard is it’s word prediction.  It is self-learning word prediction!  And by page three, it knew my student was writing a pattern story and would pop the pattern up in the word prediction area!

We shared our story on iBooks for others to read. The student was engaged for 30 minutes (wow … so was I) working on literacy, following instructions, fine motor, turn taking …….
Posted by Lorraine Court (EICS, Learning Services Consultant)